Free GAMSAT Practice Questions [Updated 2022]

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Free GAMSAT Practice Questions [Updated 2022]

Free GAMSAT Practice Questions

Every GAMSAT student ever, wants free GAMSAT practice questions. The key to achieving a high score in the GAMSAT is to become familiar with the style of questions and practise these to develop your technique. It is also very important to practise answering the questions within the timing of the real exam.


Free GAMSAT Practice Tests (Free GAMSAT Prep)


Although there are distinct sections within the GAMSAT, it’s important to realise that each question combines elements of science knowledge, reasoning, and critical thinking. To excel in the GAMSAT exam, potential examinees must be incredibly prepared before arriving to take their exam (by utilising free GAMSAT practice questions or premium GAMSAT preparation courses), and they must have a strong understanding of what types of GAMSAT Section questions to expect in each of the sections.


If you haven't done so already, check out our free GAMSAT preparation resources which also contains extensive and free GAMSAT practice questions.

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Free GAMSAT Study guides


If you haven't already done so, check out our free GAMSAT practice questions by clicking on our article regarding how to prepare for GAMSAT Section 1.


This will include an overview of what to expect in Section 1 of the GAMSAT exam and how to prepare: Includes study tips, MCQ tricks and a reading list.


Make sure you also check out our free articles that deep dive into the novels to read for GAMSAT Section 1 and also provide value in readiness for GAMSAT Section 1 poetry.


For additional free GAMSAT practice questions and guides on the other two sections of the GAMSAT then check out how to prepare for GAMSAT Section 2. This is an invaluable resource for you to leverage. 


An overview of what to expect in Section 2 of the GAMSAT exam and how to prepare: Includes study tips, MCQ tricks and a reading list, with examples of how to write your essays for Task A and Task B. If that's not enough to wet your appetite there's more. Don't forget to check out another free article of ours that provides an overview of what to expect in Section 3 of the GAMSAT exam and how to prepare for GAMSAT Section 3.  


The Best Way To Study For GAMSAT


The GAMSAT is a long and difficult exam. The questions are complex and pull together many types of knowledge and skills. The best way to prepare for these types of questions is to immerse yourself in practice tests.


Practice tests help you to familiarize yourself with the exam format and the types of questions you will encounter. Taking practice tests can also help you identify areas where you need to spend extra time studying.


To learn more, you can visit our free GAMSAT A-Z study guides on how to prepare for the GAMSAT. You can find free GAMSAT Preparation guides above.


Also, make sure you check out our GAMSAT Section 2 quote generator for free GAMSAT section 2 essay prompts.


Use Alternative GAMSAT Study Methods


Many GAMSAT examinees find it useful to incorporate alternative study methods into their overall preparation plan. Flashcards for the GAMSAT are a great way to brush up on vocabulary and foundational medical knowledge. And they are portable, so you can take them out anytime you have a few minutes to review them. Study guides for the GAMSAT can also ensure that you spend time studying all content areas that you will encounter.


Simulate the GAMSAT Testing Experience


Another crucial strategy in preparing for the GAMSAT is simulating the entire testing experience. This process means that you will complete the required amount of questions in each section within the allotted time.


Since the GAMSAT is incredibly long, simulating it can give you an idea of how well you perform under the time constraints and over a period of hours. Then, you can incorporate strategies to optimise your performance on the day of the exam - such as pacing yourself adequately and knowing when you might need a break.


Have a look at some free GAMSAT practice questions we've placed in the next section.


Free GAMSAT Section 1 Practice Questions and Answers


Free GAMSAT Section 1 Poetry Questions Part 1


A Bird Came Down the Walk By Emily Dickinson,


Question 1

According to the first two stanzas of the poem, the bird did all of the following EXCEPT?

A.  eat a worm

B. drink some few

C. eat a blade of grass

D. move aside for a beetle


Question 2

Read these two lines from the poem: 

“He bit an angle-worm in halves”

“And ate the fellow, raw.”


Which of the following describes the relationship between these two lines?

A.  The lines make a comparison.

B.  The lines describe the order of events that occurred.

C. The lines show differences between objects in the poem.

D.  The second sentence gives the cause of the first.


Question 3

Which of the following conclusions about the bird is supported by the poem?

A. The bird was hungry and thirsty.

B.  The bird did not know how to fly.

C.  The bird was a Blue Jay.

D.  The bird was injured.


Question 4

Read these lines from the poem:

Like one in danger, cautious,

I offered him a crumb,


Based on the text, the word cautious means

A. pleased

B. careful

C. awake

D. grateful


Question 5

The primary purpose of this poem is to describe

A.  the author’s experience of watching a bird and its actions

B.  the reason people should not interact with birds

C.  how to use imagery and metaphors when writing about nature

D.  the various things a person might see outside


Answers for GAMSAT questions 1-6


Question 1

According to the first two stanzas of the poem, the bird did all of the following EXCEPT?

A.  eat a worm

B. drink some few

C. eat a blade of grass

D. move aside for a beetle


Question 2

Read these two lines from the poem: 

“He bit an angle-worm in halves”

“And ate the fellow, raw.”


Which of the following describes the relationship between these two lines?

A.  The lines make a comparison.

B.  The lines describe the order of events that occurred.

C. The lines show differences between objects in the poem.

D.  The second sentence gives the cause of the first.


Question 3

Which of the following conclusions about the bird is supported by the poem?

A. The bird was hungry and thirsty.

B.  The bird did not know how to fly.

C.  The bird was a Blue Jay.

D.  The bird was injured.


Question 4

Read these lines from the poem:

Like one in danger, cautious,

I offered him a crumb,


Based on the text, the word cautious means

A. pleased

B. careful

C. awake

D. grateful


Question 5

The primary purpose of this poem is to describe

A.  the author’s experience of watching a bird and its actions

B.  the reason people should not interact with birds

C.  how to use imagery and metaphors when writing about nature

D.  the various things a person might see outside


Free GAMSAT Section 1 Poetry Questions Part 2 


Analysis of A Bird, came down the Walk


‘A Bird, came down the Walk’ by Emily Dickinson is a five stanza poem that is separated into sets of five lines. As was common within Dickinson’s works, she uses quatrains, or sets of four lines to structure the piece. One will also immediately take note of her characteristic capitalizations and dashes, over which literary scholars are divided. In this particular poem, the dashes only appear at the ends of the lines. This might have been done to elongate a pause before a reader moves to the next line.

In regards to meter, the poem conforms to iambic trimeter. This means that each line contains three sets of two beats. The first of these is unstressed and the second stressed. The rhyme scheme is a bit looser. There is almost a pattern of ABCB, if not for a few half or slant rhymes, such as that which appears in stanza three. 

The poem begins with the speaker describing a bird she sees. She is close by, making it so that she can look at the bird, but it does not immediately notice her. From where she is situated, she sees the bird pick up an “Angle Worm” and bite it in half. It moves quickly from place to place, showing the anxiety inherent to most of its species. It knows the dangers presented by the much larger and stronger world. 

In the last sections the speaker attempts to offer the bird a crumb. It does not want anything to do with a human being and flies away. Its movements are swift yet purposeful, as if it is swimming.


Stanza 1


A Bird, came down the Walk – 
He did not know I saw –
He bit an Angle Worm in halves
And ate the fellow, raw,


In the first stanza of ‘A Bird, came down the Walk’ the speaker begins by describing the simple, yet beautiful movements of a bird. This particular bird is coming “down the Walk.”


This is likely a sidewalk or path of some kind near the speaker’s home, or where she is situated. The speaker is able to observe the bird’s actions without it immediately becoming frightened. This says something about humans and their interactions with nature. Birds are rightfully wary of the presence of humans.


They will not behave in the same way if they are knowingly being watched.


The speaker does not have any ill intentions though. She is simply reporting on what she’s seeing, and finding importance in the instinctual actions of the bird. It finds a worm, noted here as an “Angle Worm,” and eats it raw, biting it in half. 


Stanza 2


And then, he drank a Dew 
From a convenient Grass –
And then hopped sidewise to the Wall
To let a Beetle pass –


The next thing the speaker sees is the bird drinking the “Dew” from the grass. It doesn’t have to go anywhere else to find water, making the “Dew” and “Grass” “convenient.” So far, its life has been presented as a simple movement from need to need.


In the next two lines another small life is introduced, the “Beetle.” While the two creatures might be simple to human eyes, the bird makes a conscious effort to “hop” to the side and “let” the beetle crawl past.


The bird is very aware of its world, as will be seen in the final stanzas.


Stanza 3


He glanced with rapid eyes,
That hurried all abroad –
They looked like frightened Beads, I thought,
He stirred his Velvet Head. –


In stanza three of ‘the bird’s reactions to its world are carefully studied by the speaker. It is clear she is truly watching this creature and taking sound mental notes on what it is doing. She notices its inherent anxiety. No matter what it’s doing it looks around “with rapid eyes.”


They move quickly, “all abroad,” trying to see everything at once. It is very on edge and aware of the variety of dangers it might face. 


The speaker takes some liberties with the description and states how the bird’s eyes appear like “frightened Beads.” They are shiny, probably black, and moving or rolling around easily. The bird becomes scared of the speaker and “stir[s]” its “Velvet Head.” This description of his feathers is interesting.


Dickinson uses the word “Velvet” implying a kind of luxury about the animal. It is clear she, or at least the speaker she is channelling, sees the bird as a lovely thing. 


Stanza 4


Like one in danger, Cautious,
I offered him a Crumb,
And he unrolled his feathers,
And rowed him softer Home –


The fourth stanza of ‘A Bird, came down the Walk’ describes the one interaction the speaker attempts with the bird. She reaches out to him and offers “him a crumb” of food. The bird does not react positively to this intrusion on its space and as its instincts require, flies away. 


In Dickinson’s words, the action is much more complicated and elegant.


The bird is said to “unroll…his feathers.” It is a process the speaker sees slowly and is able to study. Each feather passes her by in all its “Velvet” beauty. When he takes to the sky he is said to “row” to his “Home,” wherever that may be.


The use of the word “row” here, as if applying to sailing, starts a metaphor that continues into the fifth stanza. Dickinson closely relates water and flight and the movements which make them up. 


Stanza 5


Than Oars divide the Ocean,
Too silver for a seam,
Or Butterflies, off Banks of Noon, 
Leap, splashless as they swim.


The last stanza is more metaphorical than those which came before it. 


The speaker is interested in how the bird’s wings move through the air. She describes this process as being similar to “Oars divid[ing] the Ocean.” 


The bird has a clear beauty that is compared to a butterfly that takes off from the “Banks of Noon” in the heat of the day. It jumps and moves “splashless” through the air. It cuts through the air as an oar would through the water.


Free GAMSAT Section 2 Prompts


Section 2 of the GAMSAT is a really funny section because the score you get is dependent upon the markers subjective opinion on whether you've met a set criteria for both your tasks. Here are some free GAMSAT practice questions and essay prompts.


Free GAMSAT Task A Essay Prompts


Theme: Communism


1. Under capitalism, man exploits man. Under communism, it's just the opposite.

2. The goal of socialism is communism.

3. Remember that the Communist Party is a meritocracy in China.

4. Socialism is the same as Communism, only better English.


Theme: Kindness


1. No one has ever become poor by giving.

2. Charity begins at home, and justice begins next door.

3. A little thought and a little kindness are often worth more than a great deal of money.

4. My religion is very simple. My religion is kindness.


Free GAMSAT Task B Essay Prompts


Theme: Loss


1. The five stages - denial, anger, bargaining, depression, and acceptance - are a part of the framework that makes up our learning to live with the one we lost.

2. It's sad when someone you know becomes someone you knew.

3. Don't grieve. Anything you lose comes round in another form.

4. That though the radiance which was once so bright be now forever taken from my sight. We will grieve not, rather find strength in what remains behind.


Theme: Religion


1. People don't want to go to the dump and have a picnic, they want to go out to a beautiful place and enjoy their day. And so I think our job is to try to take the environment, take what the good Lord has given us and enhance it, without destroying it.

2. Within the covers of the Bible are the answers for all the problems men face.

3. Human rights is a universal standard. It is a component of every religion and every civilization.

4. Geography has made us neighbours. History has made us friends. Economics has made us partners, and necessity has made us allies. Those whom God has so joined together, let no man put asunder.


Free GAMSAT Section 3 Practice Questions

Free Section 3 Practice Questions

Some GAMSAT biology questions are hard and there's no way around this section. So what do you need to know about the GAMSAT biology section? This blog is the ultimate guide to understanding what is assessed within this section of the GAMSAT and how to successfully prepare for it. We also take a look at several biology and biochemistry sample questions and provide an expert breakdown of the answers.


It should come as no surprise that one of the most tested subjects on the GAMSAT is biology, as medicine involves more biology than any other scientific discipline. This section of the GAMSAT emphasises deep knowledge by asking students to integrate and analyse information from many different disciplines.


In designing the GAMSAT, the medical field identified “big ideas” in biology and biochemistry for which a solid foundation will be critical to your success in medical school and as a future physician. Acing the biology section of the GAMSAT will demonstrate to admissions committees that you are ready for the challenges that lie ahead!


Free Biology Practice Questions


Mammalian nerve cells have on their outer surface a subtype of glutamate receptors called the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor. The NMDA receptor binds glutamate, an amino acid neurotransmitter, which ultimately results in the inward flow of calcium ions.


The NMDA receptor has been studied by exposing nerve cells to ischemic conditions (a diminished flow of blood) which result in localized brain damage. The affected neurons demonstrate depleted energy reserves with decreased internal stores of ATP. Energy-driven Na + /K + ATPase enzymes located in the cell membrane begin to fail.


If the ischemic conditions continue, the neuronal cell membrane depolarizes, providing an excitatory stimulus for the release of excessive amounts of glutamate. Other nerve cells in close proximity experience sustained binding of glutamate to NMDA receptor sites, which can lead to further cell membrane depolarization.


Experiment 1


Cultured nerve cells were exposed to normal or decreased oxygen concentrations. Differing concentrations of extracellular calcium or glutamate antagonists were also established. Intracellular calcium levels were measured after one minute. The results of this experiment are listed below:

Key:

  • L = low concentration, H = high concentration
  • + = present, − = absent
  • N = normal, I = increase


Experiment 2


Several cultured neurons were bathed in a solution containing high concentrations of calcium, sodium, and chloride ions, but not oxygen. The cells experienced marked swelling and eventually an action potential was evoked. After the action potential, internal ion levels were measured every 30 seconds. Intracellular levels of both calcium and sodium were elevated.


Based on these two experiments, researchers have proposed that the initial effects of activation of the NMDA receptor can be modelled as follows:

Figure 1: Further experiments suggested that the NMDA receptor also allowed K 

Question 1

Regarding Experiment 2, which of the following is the most likely reason that the cells experienced marked swelling?

A.  Activation of the NMDA receptor due to ischemia blocked aquaporins, preventing the efflux of water from the cell.

B. The failure of the Na+ /K+ ATPase led to osmotic influx of water.

C. The high intracellular concentrations of sodium and calcium led to the osmotic influx of water.

D. The influx of sodium due to the action potential led to the osmotic influx of water.


Question 2

Which of the following amino acids would most likely be found in the transmembrane portion of the NMDA receptor?

A. Leu 

B. Pro

C. Arg

D. Asn


Question 3

Regarding Experiment 1, if glutamate is the only neurotransmitter that can bind to the NMDA receptor to increase the inward flow of calcium, which of the following would account for the lack of calcium flow in the presence of oxygen, extracellular calcium, and no glutamate antagonists?

A. No glutamate was supplied to the cells in the extracellular medium.

B. Other glutamate receptor subtypes inhibit the flow of calcium into the cell.

C. In the presence of oxygen the cell does not depolarize.

D.  Ischemic conditions prevent the normal functioning of the Na+ /K+ ATPases. 


Answers for Biology GAMSAT questions 1-3


Question 1

The cells were kept in ischemic (low oxygen) conditions. Oxygen is required for ATP synthesis, and ATP is required to operate the Na+ /K+ ATPases. In the absence of oxygen, the lack of ATP would cause the Na+ /K+ ATPases to fail. One of the functions of the ATPases is to maintain osmotic equilibrium for the cell; as it pumps ions out, water doesn’t want to come in. The failure of the pump would lead to osmotic influx of water (choice B is correct). There is nothing in the passage to support the idea that NMDA receptors block aquaporins, and even if they did, the movement of water through the aquaporins is not restricted to just efflux (choice A is wrong). While the increase in intracellular concentrations of sodium and calcium could lead to osmotic influx of water, this would happen after the action potential was induced, and the swelling occurred prior to the induction of the action potential (choices C and D are wrong).


Question 2

Proteins that span the plasma membrane must contain hydrophobic (nonpolar) amino acid residues in the transmembrane region. Of the amino acids listed, only leucine and proline are nonpolar; arginine and asparagine are both polar (choices C and D can be eliminated). Proline, while nonpolar, does not fit well into the alpha helical shape of most transmembrane regions, making leucine the more likely of the two to be found there (choice B can be eliminated, and choice A is correct).


Question 3

In the presence of oxygen, the Na+ /K+ ATPases would not fail, and the cell would not depolarize. If the cell doesn’t depolarize, then glutamate would not be released to stimulate the NMDA receptor and open the calcium channels (choice C is correct). It is true that no glutamate was supplied to the cells, but this was by design; the experiment was designed to test what happens with glutamate release and NMDA receptor stimulation in the absence of oxygen. Supplying glutamate in the extracellular medium would prevent any effect of ischemia from being seen since the cell would automatically be stimulated (choice A is wrong). It is also true that ischemic conditions prevent the normal activity of the ATPases, but these cells are not exposed to ischemic conditions (choice D is wrong), There is no reason to assume any other glutamate receptor subtypes (choice B can be eliminated). 


Conclusion

We hope that the free GAMSAT practice questions that are in this article have proven to be useful. We will keep adding to this article and provide even more value and free GAMSAT practice questions.

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